Fire Season Preparedness

Are you ready for fire season? 

Prevent Wildfires

Mowing

Mow before 10 a.m., but never when it’s windy or excessively dry. Lawn mowers are designed to mow lawns, not weeds or dry grass. Metal blades striking rocks can create sparks and start fires. Use caution.

Spark Arresters

In wildland areas, spark arresters are required on all portable gasoline-powered equipment. This includes tractors, harvesters, chainsaws, weed-eaters and mowers.

  • Keep the exhaust system, spark arresters and mower in proper working order and free of carbon buildup.
  • Use the recommended grade of fuel and don’t top it off.

Equipment Use

In wildland areas, grinding and welding operations require a permit and 10 feet of clearance. Keep a shovel and a fire extinguisher ready to use.

  • Don’t drive your vehicle onto dry grass or brush. Hot exhaust pipes and mufflers can start fires that you won’t even see – until it’s too late!
  • Keep a cell phone nearby and call 911 immediately in case of fire.

Environment

To protect water quality, do not clear vegetation near waterways to bare soil. Vegetation removal can cause soil erosion especially on steep slopes. Always keep soil disturbance to a minimum.

Secure Chains
Practice safe towing. Dragging chains throws sparks. Use appropriate safety pins and hitch ball to secure chains.

No Dragging Parts
Make sure your vehicle is properly maintained, with nothing dragging on the ground.

Check Tire Pressure
Maintain proper tire pressure. Driving on exposed wheel rims will throw sparks.

Carry a fire extinguisher in your vehicle and learn how to use it.
Don’t drive your vehicle onto dry grass or brush. hot exhaust pipes and mufflers can start fires that you won’t even see—until it’s too late!

Properly Maintain Brakes
Brakes worn too thin may cause metal to metal contact, which can cause a spark.

Camping Fire Safety—How to Build an Open Campfire

Select a level, open location away from heavy fuels such as logs, brush or decaying leaves and needles. Clear an area at least 10 feet in diameter (local regulations may vary). Scrape away grass, leaves or needles down to the mineral soil. Scoop a depression in the center of the cleared area in which to build the fire and put a ring of rocks around it. Cut wood in short lengths, pile within cleared area and light the fire. The fire should be built no larger than necessary. Your fire must never be left unattended and the fire must be extinguished completely before leaving.

While the Fire is Burning/Open Fire Safety

Always keep a shovel and bucket of water nearby at all times. While the fire is burning, be sure there is a responsible person in attendance of the fire at all times. Never leave children around a fire unattended.

How to Completely Extinguish an Open Campfire

Use the “drown, stir and feel” method: drown the fire with water, then stir around the fire area with your shovel to wet any remaining embers and ash. Be sure to turn wood and coals over and wet all sides. Move some dirt onto the fire site and mix thoroughly to fully smother it. And finally, feel the area with the back of your hand to ensure nothing is still smoldering.

Burn Season is December 1-April 30th each year unless otherwise noted. 

Before You Get Started

First, obtain a Burn Permit from Monterey Air Resources District that is required before burning. After obtaining any necessary permits, ensure that conditions allow burning for that day.

How to Safely Burn Landscape Debris

  • Landscape debris piles must be in small 4 feet by 4 feet piles.
  • Maximum pile size is 4 feet in diameter.
  • Clear all flammable material and vegetation within 10 feet of the outer edge of pile.
  • Keep a water supply and shovel close to the burning site.
  • A responsible adult is required by law to be in attendance until the fire is out.
  • No burning shall be undertaken unless weather conditions (particularly wind) are such that burning can be considered safe.

It is important for residents to stay mindful of current weather conditions when burning. If it’s windy and the surrounding vegetation is very dry, it may be best to wait and burn landscape debris another day.

What can be burned?

Dry, natural vegetation, grown on the property can still be burned outdoors in open piles, unless prohibited by local ordinances. No household trash or garbage can be burned outdoors at residences.

 

Plan

  • Create an evacuation plan including meeting location, escape routes, and a family communication plan that designates an out of area relative as a point of communication in case family members get separated 
  • Be prepared:
    • Have fire extinguishers on hand and train your family how to use them.
    • Ensure your family knows where the gas, electric, and water shut offs are located
    • Assemble an emergency supply kit
    • Maintain a list of emergency contact numbers
    • Have a portable radio or scanner so you can stay updated in the case of a fire

Know

Stay in the know about local fires by joining the following:

Act

  1. Review your Evacuation Plan Checklist.
  2. Ensure your Emergency Supply Kit is in your vehicle.
  3. Cover-up to protect against heat and flying embers. Wear long pants, long sleeve shirt, heavy shoes/boots, cap, dry bandanna for face cover, goggles or glasses. 100% cotton is preferable.
  4. Locate your pets and take them with you.